Submandibular triangle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Posted March 01, 2018

The submandibular triangle (or submaxillary or digastric triangle) corresponds to the region of the neck immediately below the body of the lower jaw.

Limits and coatings [edit] ]

  • anteriorly, through the lower border of the lower jaw body, and a line drawn from the angle of the mastoid processes;
  • then through the posterior digastric; The fascia, superficial fascia, musculocutaneous of the neck, and the deep fascia, branching in it the branches of the facial nerve and ascending filaments of the fascia. Cervical nerve cutaneous.

    Its soil is formed by the muscles of the Miloid anteriorly, and by the hyoglossus posteriorly.

    It is divided into an anterior and a posterior by the styloomandibular ligament. p>

    Anterior part The anterior part contains the submandibular gland, superficial to which it is the anterior facial vein, while embedded in the gland is the external maxillary artery and its glandular branches.

    The posterior part of this triangle contains the external carotid artery, ascending deeply into the substance of the parotid gland. The posterior part of this triangle contains the external carotid artery, ascending deeply into the substance of the parotid gland

    These blood vessels The internal carotid is crossed by the facial nerve, and the posterior auricular, temporal maxillary branches, and superficial internal branches: the deeper are the internal carotid, the internal jugular vein, and the vagus nerve, separated from the external carotid by the stylopharyngeal and stylopharyngeal, and the hypoglossal nerve

    p>

    The following are the important structures found in the submandibular triangle:

  • External and internal carotid artery
  • Internal jugular vein
  • Deep cervical lymph nodes
  • The vagus nerve
  • The submandibular gland
  • Submandibular lymph nodes
  • li>
  • The hypoglossal nerve