Trump Waives Jones Act For Puerto Rico, Lifts Restrictions On Shipping

Posted September 28, 2017

What happens to the Jones Act and Puerto Rico next?

Across Massachusetts, many have stepped up and organized efforts to send resources to the island.

"I am very concerned by the Department's decision not to waive the Jones Act for current relief efforts in Puerto Rico, which is facing a worsening humanitarian crisis following Hurricane Maria", he wrote in the letter.

For people who have family and friends still on the island, Dunn urges them to not give up hope. "This is 3.1 or 2 million Americans that are without power, without running water".

On the island, 44 percent of the people don't have access to clean drinking water.

The Trump administration had said a waiver was not needed for Puerto Rico because there were enough US -flagged ships available to ferry goods to the island.

Other videos showed damaged buildings and uprooted trees.

During a press conference held on Tuesday, President Trump defended the administration's handling of the situation by pointing out that Puerto Rico is an island and that the government can't just "drive your trucks there from other states".

President Donald Trump's advisers are sticking up for the response to Hurricane Maria and the devastation in Puerto Rico.

Agriculture, once the backbone of the Puerto Rican economy, took a direct hit.

"They need water, gas for their generators, and food". The Jones Act requires ships that deliver goods between American ports to be American-built, which isn't a big deal for most Americans.

It is hard to avoid the fact that the response looks different than previous ones.

A powerful hurricane rips through an island and you haven't heard from your loved ones who live there in a week.

"Think of it as a legally sanctioned shakedown for US shipping interests", wrote the Wall Street Journal in an editorial Wednesday.

In a Facebook post today, Mark Zuckerberg pledged $1.5 million in aid to organizations assisting in Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane Maria, together with direct assistance from Facebook's connectivity team to help the country get back online.

"There's a lot of good faith, but the good faith has to turn into action or people are going to continue to die", Cruz said.