What you need to know about OJ Simpson's upcoming parole hearing

Posted July 20, 2017

O.J. Simpson goes before a Nevada Department of Corrections Parole Board on Thursday from prison in Lovelock, NV, which will decide if the 70-year-old ex-athlete will be granted parole and released from prison as early as October of this year.

The former Heisman trophy victor and actor was arrested and accused of murder in 1994 when his ex-wife, Nicole Brown-Simpson, and her friend Ron Goldman, were found stabbed to death in California.

On Thursday, O.J. Simpson will appear before a parole board in Nevada to try and get out of prison.

As part of the lead up for the parole hearing (it will be streamed live on closed circuit television and you can watch via CBSSports.com/Live), stories about Simpson's time in prison have emerged.

The parole board is not supposed to take that murder case into consideration, but it's that case that has kept the public tuned in for years.

Simpson would at times get teased about the killings and trial, former guards Jesse Mandoki and Jeffrey Felix recalled.

O.J. Simpson had a 2013 hearing at which he was granted parole on some of the lesser charges on which he was convicted. In 2013, they granted Simpson parole on five of the 12 charges, so most believe it more likely than not that he will be freed.

Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend, Ronald Goldman, were found stabbed to death in June, 1994 outside her condo in Brentwood.

"I never thought that the crime deserved that much time, that long of a sentence", Fromong said.

"He deserves parole. It's as simple as that", says Yale Galanter, one of Simpson's defense attorneys in the armed robbery case. He was charged with a number of felony counts, including kidnapping and armed robbery.

Simpson's lawyer, LaVergne, is definitely hoping for success at the parole hearing.

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"I guess, my age, guys come to me", he told his previous parole hearing.

"And of course she said, 'Where'd you get the cookie from?'" Felix recalled. ABC News reported that Bruce Fromong, one of the memorabilia dealers targeted in the hotel robbery, will speak.

In making parole decisions, the state of Nevada uses a scoring system to evaluate the risk a prisoner might pose to the community.

Should he be freed in October, which would be nine years after his conviction, Simpson would need a place to live.

Simpson's current sentence is a result of assembling a gang of men to storm a hotel room where sports memorabilia was being stored, and despite his insistence that he was simply trying to recover his own items, he was sentenced to 33 years in jail.

Simpson was subsequently found liable for the deaths in a 1997 civil suit and was ordered to pay damages totaling $33.5 million to the families of the victims.