Republican Senator Dean Heller opposes health care bill

Posted June 26, 2017

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., speaks to reporters at the Capitol after Republicans released their long-awaited bill to scuttle much of President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017.

A comparative moderate, Heller supports the expansion of Medicare that was included in the Affordable Care Act.

"Someone has to pay for these people one way or another", she said, "So, it has to be done, I think, in a fairer way than what Republicans are proposing, one that doesn't just shift the burden to states or the people who need the health care the most".

He called it "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families" to the very rich that would raise costs, reduce coverage, roll back protections and "ruin Medicaid as we know it". Those were higher than AHCCCS's estimates of an additional $146 million in costs to the state in 2021 and $537 million in 2024.

Now, Republican lawmakers are trying to shift the language around these cuts.

Shortly after the 142-page bill was distributed, more than a half-dozen GOP lawmakers signaled concerns or initial opposition.

McConnell released the bill Thursday, drafted after weeks of closed-door meetings searching for middle ground between conservative senators seeking an aggressive repeal of Obama's statute and centrists warning about going too far.

Hospital stocks have been under pressure from the possibility of health-care reform because they have been more profitable under Obamacare, which the Congressional Budget Office said would result in 23 million more Americans with insurance over a decade than under the House GOP plan.

Sen. Chuck Schumer, deeming his fight a matter of "life and death", vowed Friday "to use every single ounce of energy that I have" to defeat the Republican health care bill to repeal Obamacare.

Flake and fellow Arizona Sen.

Trump said getting approval would require traveling a "very, very narrow path" but that "I think we're going to get there".

But the measure landed in rough seas ahead of a vote that Sen. Democrats are expected to vote as a bloc against the bill, meaning it could be defeated with as few as three Republican votes. Bill Cassidy, R-Louisiana, said Sunday on CBS' "Face the Nation" that while he's undecided on the bill, he's open to a "yes" vote if certain elements that affect his state can be addressed. However, "as now drafted, this bill does not do almost enough to lower premiums". Bernie Sanders went so far to call it "by far the most harmful piece of legislation [he's] seen in [his] lifetime".

"We're concerned that it would lead to dramatic cuts in services or dramatic cuts in the number of beneficiaries who would rely on Medicaid", said Kristine Grow, a spokeswoman for AHIP.

Flake was not in the Phoenix office Friday but Michael Vargas, his state director, told protesters he would pass along their messages.

He said that if Republicans come up with a plan that is "demonstrably better than the improvements we made to our health care system, that covers as many people at less cost, I would gladly and publicly support it".