GOP senator says Iowans might not lose Medicaid

Posted June 26, 2017

"I can not support a piece of legislation that takes away insurance from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans".

"It doesn't protect Nevadans on Medicaid and the most vulnerable Nevadans", Heller said at a news conference Friday in Las Vegas, but he did not rule out supporting a reworked version.

Sen. Rand Paul, one of the key Republicans senators in the ongoing health care battle, said on Sunday that his party has "promised too much" with trying to fix the health care system and assuring that the cost of premiums will be lowered.

"If President Trump thought the health care bill in the House was mean, I can tell you that the Senate Republican plan is downright nasty", Menendez said.

The Senate's 142-page proposal, worked out in secret by a group led by McConnell, aims to deliver on a central Trump campaign promise to undo former President Barack Obama's signaturehealthcare law, which has provided coverage to 20 million Americans since it was passed in 2010.

Ben Sasse of Nebraska said Sunday he has yet to throw his support behind the Senate's health care bill.

Not one Democrat plans on supporting the bill, which means Republicans can only afford to lose two more votes in the Senate or the bill will fail.

Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst is suggesting Iowans would not be losing Medicaid coverage even as the Senate GOP health care bill would phase out financing to expand the low-income insurance program. Since Sen. Mitch McConnell has indicated he wants to vote on this bill prior to the July 4 recess, there obviously will be little time, at best, for public comment.

Thursday, Senate Republicans revealed their approach to repealing and replacing the Obama administration's signature health care initiative, the Affordable Care Act. They actually stop them at a lower level of income at 350 percent, so three and a half times poverty rather than four times poverty, which is current law.

Appearing next to Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, also a Republican, Heller announced his opposition to the legislation, highlighting the Better Care Act's proposed substantial cuts to Medicaid. At least four GOP senators-along with all Democrats-have voiced opposition to the bill.

For the House of Representatives' version of healthcare, Trump held regular meetings with representatives at the White House.

"This is a awful bill", Minnesota Sen. It is expected to run the same calculations on number of insured and cost of premiums for the Senate draft bill early next week.

"When you are doing something good, you want everyone to know", Menendez said.

With a third of the Senate coming up for re-election in 2018, many will have to weigh the state-wide implications before voting for the bill. Reducing taxes, Republicans argue, will boost the economy, and shrinking spending on programs such as Medicaid will slow the growth of the federal debt.