I felt rocked by fame: Lorde

Posted June 17, 2017

Pop singer Lorde just released her second album, "Melodrama". During the four year interim between records, so much has happened.

After two albums, Lorde has demonstrated a favorite song structure - a low-key, generally a capella, kickoff before a steady buildup into full-effect choruses.

When's the last time you listened to Pure Heroine? And Lorde has done so beautifully.

If you can't get a ticket you may be able to find one on Twickets. After working in sparse electropop on "Pure Heroine", Lorde has graduated to productions that incorporate brass blasts ("Sober"), insistent piano riffs ("Green Light") and heavy vocal layering ("Perfect Places"). Jack Antonoff (of fun. and Bleachers) co-wrote and co-produced the record, giving Lorde's sad girl demographic a bigger beat to dance to. In the beginning, she's waiting for it. Also, unlike her squad leader, the Kiwi vows that she won't be held hostage by her relationship if it ends. "How did I get all this way without knowing I had far-apart eyes?' Just weird s**t like that", she says.

Enough that the 20-year-old starlet is fine with being not as in the spotlight! The way that each song shifts focus from Lorde's vocals to honing in focus on the diverse instrumentals is refreshing - she gives you a reprieve from your feelings when the lyrics pause for a few moments in each track.

But lover, you're the one to blame / All that you're doing / Can you hear the violence? But I really love that song. The contrasting sounds and attitudes make them a ideal dichotomy. Where can she possibly go with it?

Fame has its negative side, and it was something "Green Light" singer Lorde learned the hard way when her hit single "Royals" came out in 2013. Now, though, we've got Kate Bush-like wails on "Writer in the Dark", second single "Liability" has the folksy unease of mid-career Bright Eyes, and the guitar outro of "The Lourve" sounds like Disintegration-era The Cure, or maybe something by The Cranberries. And I don't think that song is apologising for it. I'm the kind of artist that'd be like, 'Oh, you want that?

Everything about the annotation, from the grammar to the candid resignation that she's a mess, reminds us how young Lorde is, despite how old she sounds. "I feel like I'm the work's mom".