N. Korean Missile Can Reach Seoul in Six Minutes

Posted May 20, 2017

This data underlines the progress made by Pyongyang in its efforts to develop an intercontinental nuclear missile in the future that can reach the USA and serve as a deterrent.

It has been working to develop a nuclear-tipped missile capable of striking the US mainland, and experts say Sunday's test was another step toward that aim.

On Monday, the U.N. Security Council said it was vital that North Korea show "sincere commitment to denuclearization through concrete action and stressed the importance of working to reduce tensions".

No doubt, considering the threatening nature of North Korea, which is certainly rising day by day, it is more important for the US and South Korea to improve their ties as quick as possible.

Admiral Harry Harris Jr, who is in charge of the United States Pacific Command based in Hawaii, said on Wednesday (17 May) that North Korean leader Kim Jong-un was inching closer to developing a nuclear warhead capable of striking any country.

North Korea has defied all calls to rein in its nuclear and missile programs, even from China, its lone major ally, calling them legitimate self-defense.

"North Korea seems to be very aware of the US attack on Syria", Jiro Ishimaru of Asia Press said, adding that the media outlet's North Korean source clearly said "preparations against cruise missiles". He also said there are many companies willing to invest in North Korea and if the North makes the right choice, it will be good for its development, according to Hong.

Hong said South Korea had not yet received official word from the USA on whether Seoul should pay for an antimissile U.S. radar system that has been deployed outside Seoul.

The United States wants North Korea to trust its promise of no hostility and conduct no more nuclear or missile tests before Washington can consider opening talks with the communist nation, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was quoted as saying Thursday.

The latest move by the North presents a dilemma for South Korea's foreign policy.

Cathcart said "things are certainly fraught in a way that is worrisome, if not indicative of a wholesale shift in Beijing", but he added that the opaque nature of politics in the two neighboring authoritarian regimes meant reading the tea leaves was always hard.

"If you are a country that is supplying or supporting North Korea, we will call you out on it". He said the council is exploring many different avenues to proceed and "clearly sanctions are a way to go", but also diplomacy.

Whether the threats will materialize into a new round of sanctions is likely to be decided Tuesday, when a closed-door UNSC meeting on North Korea is scheduled to take place.

The US vessel is reportedly still patrolling in the region.

The two Koreas - technically still at war after the 1950-53 conflict ended only with a ceasefire instead of a peace treaty - have occasionally clashed along the border.