Senate panel chairman: Flynn won't honor subpoena

Posted May 19, 2017

Sen. Richard Burr (R., N.C.), chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said Thursday that former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn has not yet told the committee how he will respond to its subpoena for documents related to Flynn's interactions with Russian Federation.

Burr told reporters Thursday about the response from Flynn's lawyer. Hours earlier, Burr said Flynn's lawyer said he wouldn't comply, "and that is not a surprise to the committee".

The committee issued the subpoena for Flynn's records on May 10 after he declined to cooperate with an April 28 request for documents. "Consistent with the committee's position since the beginning of or investigation, I welcome their willingness to cooperate", Burr said.

Ousted White House National Security adviser Michael Flynn will apparently not be testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee anytime soon about Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

Though Flynn has left the Trump administration, the controversy surrounding him has not subsided as newly announced special counsel Robert Mueller, Congress and the FBI investigate potential collusion between Trump campaign associates and the Russian government.

"The appointment of former FBI director and respected lawyer Robert Mueller.is a positive development and will provide some certainty for the American people that the investigation will proceed fairly and free of political influence", said Burr and co-chair Sen. Flynn's attorneys had said in the past that he might not turn over requested documents. Flynn was sacked from his position as Trump's national security adviser in February. Following the election, Flynn had reportedly discussed with Kislyak the potential of establishing a back channel communication between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin that would circumvent the US national security community, Reuters reports. Emails, text messages, letters, phone records and information about financial and real estate holdings associated with Russian Federation were among the information requested by the committee.

A report by the New York Times claims the Trump administration knew in January 2017 of adviser Michael Flynn's contact with Russian diplomats. Fl...

Just as the Supreme Court has long recognized congressional subpoena power, so too has it upheld the enforcement power of contempt. That resolution would then be put to a vote by the full senate. "No matter what option they take, it's not quick".