Republican governors urge Congress to drop proposed Obamacare replacement

Posted March 20, 2017

And now Cotton, who won his seat in 2014 partly by lambasting his Democratic predecessor for supporting Barack Obama's health care bill, is very publicly on the attack against the House health legislation backed by Speaker Paul Ryan and the White House.

After meeting with members of the Republican Study Committee, Trump said everyone at the meeting had agreed to vote in favor of the bill.

The shift came after a private meeting of House Republicans from which Ryan (R-Wis.) emerged to tell reporters that his proposal to revise the Affordable Care Act would "incorporate feedback" from the rank-and-file.

The CBO's long-awaited cost analysis of the House GOP leadership plan, including estimates on the number of people expected to be covered, will likely affect Republicans' chances of passing the proposal.

"States can not successfully administer a quality Medicaid program that grants significant flexibility in lieu of adequate funding", they wrote in their plan.

In another warning signal, four GOP governors wrote congressional leaders Thursday saying the bill's approach to Medicaid would not work for states. That's a bit curious since it was believe that anything giving states more flexibility in administering Medicaid couldn't pass muster under the Senate's budget reconciliation rules, so we'll see what the details are. "They will have to tone down number the number of uninsured.in dramatic fashion", Mr Strazzella said. Meanwhile you have other members of Congress such as Rand Paul who feel a bulk of the American Health Care Act is too similar to Obamacare and needs to be broken down and restarted, this included Medicaid.

Since the passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Republican politicians have vowed to repeal and replace the landmark legislation known to many as "Obamacare".

For example, if a person's coverage lapses from non-payment, Baldwin says an insurance company will have the ability to deny them coverage. And though he's been one of Trump's unwavering supporters, including using his position on the Armed Services Committee to defend the president over Russian Federation, he's not ready to fall in line yet, especially given the mixed signals Trump has sent on whether he actually supports the bill as-is.

A Kaiser Family Foundation report found that more than 11 million Americans have been able to get health care coverage through Medicaid expansion thanks to the Affordable Care Act. Without most people on board, the House can not even get it to the Senate to even consider.

"This bill doesn't come close to achieving the goal of allowing low-income seniors to purchase health insurance", Collins said. Collins' opposition leaves the bill short of the support it needs in the Senate unless it changes, since GOP leaders can only lose two votes. "They can't get it together to get all the paperwork together". Things would need to be fixed up to where most could get on board.

Back at the White House, President Trump's personal thoughts on all of this remain entirely unclear.